Saturday, August 12, 2006

FAQ #2: How do I become a book editor?

A lot of people on the podcast tour expressed an interest in publishing as a career, so I thought I'd make this the next of my extremely-infrequent FAQs. I decided I wanted to be an editor in high school, and this is more or less the program I followed—by accident far more than design, I assure you. But it served me well, so I hope it’s useful to any aspiring editors out there too.

In high school
Read. Passionately and widely: the newspaper, Jane Austen, Philip Pullman, Jennifer Crusie, Stephen King, Malcolm Gladwell, Robert Heinlein, T. S. Eliot, Sophie Kinsella, Geoffrey Chaucer, Lewis Lapham, The New Yorker, A. A. Milne, Alan Moore, Larry McMurtry, Lois McMaster Bujold, Mark Twain; fiction and nonfiction, children’s books and adult books, across all genres and at every literary level. If you’re not sure where to begin, ask a reading adult you respect for advice. Then try a little bit of everything and read more of what you love. The point here is developing your taste: finding your literary passions, and getting familiar with everything else.

It is also important to note here that you will probably not be ready for some of the literature you’ll encounter—if you try Philip Roth, say, or A. S. Byatt, or Patrick O’Brian, you may not understand it or appreciate it quite yet, and that’s okay. I took A. S. Byatt’s Possession out of the library when I was in high school because I liked the cover and the sound of the story and I wanted to impress the adults around me; the book itself, however, bored me stiff, and I quit after probably twenty pages. But I picked it up again in college, when I was studying literature and could finally get all the literary references, and it’s now one of my favorite books in life. So if something doesn’t work for you, don’t dismiss it totally; put it away, try it again in a few years when you’re a different person, and see how you feel about it then.

Think about what you read. If you loved a book, what did you love about it? If you didn’t like it, what didn’t you like about it? This will help you both to refine your taste and to develop the practice of thinking critically about literature.

Begin studying argumentative structure and language—or in other words, writing. All writing is persuasion, even fiction writing: You’re persuading the reader to be drawn into your world, to love your characters, to feel the emotion you’re feeling. The five-paragraph essay structure you learn in Language Arts class may seem stupid and suffocating beyond endurance, but it teaches you to practice the most essential principle of good writing, which is show, don’t tell. You lay forth your thesis (“Jane was a beautiful cat.”), and you prove it by showing the reader the evidence (“Her thick coat was a rich, pearly white, her eyes the glassy green of spring leaves, and each foot was tipped in deep black, like a period on her elegant sentence.”). Do this over and over again, and you can write a paper, or a short story, or a whole book.

Of course, you also need to move forward beyond description, and that five-paragraph essay also teaches you to structure and advance an argument the same way you do a plot: This piece of information or section of the argument leads to this piece of information or section of the argument leads to this piece of information or section of the argument, and you couldn’t have that information in any other order (or any of that information missing) without the whole thing falling apart. I knew a computer-science major in college who said that he wrote all his papers like C++ programs: The thesis statement was like setting the main function of the program running, and then each paragraph below that was a subprogram that served the main program. I love this analogy, as good writing is indeed like a well-constructed computer program: Every word is essential, nothing forgotten or else it won’t function, nothing extraneous to bug it up. (Debate is also useful for instilling this argumentative structure in your brain.)

Finally, pay attention to all the boring stuff your English teacher and various style guides put forth about diagramming sentences, "apprise" vs. "appraise," the correct use of the ellipsis versus the dash and so on. These rules are the nuts and bolts of everyday English usage, spelling, and punctuation, and the sooner you have all the rules in your head, the more second nature they will become.

Work on your school’s literary magazine or newspaper. This will give you experience in multiple areas useful in publishing: making editorial judgments; putting a literary product together; collaborating with others to do so, and learning how to negotiate sometimes differing visions; and of course the editing itself.

In college
Continue to practice reading, writing, and literary magazine/newspaper work. People often ask, “Do I need to major in English?” The strict answer is “no,” because the most important things in college are learning to think and read and write, and you can learn all those things in any discipline with the right teachers and challenges. However, English will give you the most hands-on experience with analyzing how a piece of writing (particularly fiction) is constructed and functions, so it is probably the most useful field of study for an aspiring editor. Besides, if you love fiction and reading, being an English major is huge fun because you’re studying the things you love most; ignore your uncle’s jibes about “Fries with that?” and follow your heart.

Work in your college’s Writing Center. This will give you experience with communicating your ideas about what’s not working in a piece of writing to the person who created that writing—an act that requires not just good editorial skills but good interpersonal ones as well.

Read “Publishers Weekly” in your college library. This will teach you about trends in the industry, familiarize you with the personalities and books associated with various publishers, and show you what reviewers value in books--a useful tool in forming your own critical judgment. I recommend this particularly during your junior and senior years, when you’re thinking about getting an internship or getting a job after graduation. (For extra credit and information, check out PublishersLunch and the New York Times Book Review.)

Do an internship. Nearly every major New York publisher offers summer internships to college students, and many offer internships during the school year as well (though they’re often unpaid). Internships helps you make connections, establish a publishing resume, learn what editors look for in manuscripts, discover all the various processes that go into putting a book together. . . . There’s no better way to see the day-to-day life of a publishing house (and particularly of an editorial assistant). Also, fifty percent of publishers are based outside New York City; if there’s an interesting small press located in a city near you, ask if you can do a part-time internship, or even just come in for an informational interview (see below).

Remember that there are other jobs in publishing besides editing. Book publishers also need book designers; copyeditors; advertising designers; marketing strategists; subsidiary rights sellers; publicists; accountants; administrators, and many, many other people as well. If you love talking about books but you don’t really like the nitty-gritty manuscript work, you might make a wonderful publicist. Or if you think you’d enjoy translating a book’s ideas into visual form, maybe you’d be an excellent jacket designer. Follow your passion, and there’s probably a way that can fit into publishing.

After graduation
Consider a publishing course. A publishing course is a four- to eight-week summer course that introduces you to the industry and is usually taught by industry professionals (allowing you to make useful contacts for getting a job afterward). Most people who enroll in these courses have just graduated from college, but they also attract people looking to switch jobs or just interested in the industry.

The two best-established ones that I know of are the Columbia Publishing Course at Columbia University; and the Denver Publishing Institute at the University of Denver. (I thought NYU had one as well, but I can’t find a link to their summer program, only their Master’s degree in publishing.) The two programs differ in that the Columbia course is eight weeks long, covers magazine as well as book publishing, and, as it’s based in New York, is heavily New York publishing-centric, with a wide array of big-publishing luminaries. Denver is four weeks long, focuses exclusively on book publishing, and places its emphasis on small presses as well as big publishing. (I chose Denver because I knew I wanted to be in book publishing and I wasn’t sure I wanted to move to New York; I had a terrific experience there and recommend it highly.) If you’ve done a summer internship, you probably don’t need to attend one of these courses; but if you haven’t done an internship and you’re pretty sure you want to be in publishing, they’re a great way to learn the basics of the industry and make some connections.

N.B.: I do not recommend these courses for writers because you ought to be concentrating on the craft of your individual writing more than the overall business of publishing. Look into an M.F.A. instead.

Go on informational interviews. Editors love talking about their books and their jobs—at least I do—and as we were all editorial assistants once, we’re generally happy to speak with people who aspire to the position. Subjects covered usually include the day-to-day editorial life; how to begin and develop a publishing career; favorite books; and whatever else you’re interested in talking about that’s related to publishing. An intelligent informational interview also establishes you as a candidate for any future job openings with that editor. (For the record, it’s often useful to read one of the editor’s books before the interview; Rachel, our lovely assistant editor at AALB, came in for her job interview in fall 2003, sat down with me, said “I just read Millicent Min, Girl Genius and I loved it,” and instantly became my new best friend.) Editors can be very busy, and they’re doing this for you as a favor, so be considerate of their schedules and appreciative of any time they might grant.

Any other editors or publishing people who read this blog, please chime in with your own advice. And all aspiring editors -- good luck!

ETA, 10/15/09: This is the first entry that comes up on the Google search for "How to Become a Book Editor," so I frequently receive e-mails from people asking for further information or advice. I regret that I am unable to respond to these inquiries at this time. If you want to know more about the craft of editing, please click on the "Editing" and "Writing" tags at left.

ETA, 3/20/10: Two more excellent editorial takes on this topic: How to Get a Job in Publishing, by Margaret Maloney of Bloomsbury USA, and so you want to be an editor., by Sharyn November of Viking/Firebird.

91 comments:

  1. Cheryl, this is wondrous fine, and so useful. I am going to be so happy to have this URL to send to people.
    Many thanks for your insight and thoughtfulness, and willingness to share.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Thank you so much for writing all this down. I'm an aspiring editor and I have always looked for information like this. I'll refer back to it often!

    ReplyDelete
  3. This is great advice. The only thing I'd add to this is that in addition to your advice about internships, a lot of colleges have presses or publishing departments, and especially if a student can't afford an unpaid internship, they might consider applying for paid editorial assistant positions. At my college, they recruited EAs for the Humanities Publication Center from English classes. It's something to keep an eye out for.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Hi Cheryl,
    Cool post! In addition to their master's degree in publishing and their publishing certificate program, NYU has a Summer Publishing Institute.
    http://www.scps.nyu.edu/docs/pdf/SCPS_Pub.pdf
    is the address of the bulletin in which you can read about the program (I think it's on page one).

    ReplyDelete
  5. What a wonderful post. Thanks for taking the time.
    Here's a question. You said your tastes have changed/matured as a reader. But... have you ever read a manuscript, rejected it, then sometime later thought about it and understood its beauty? Perhaps as your life unfolds and the manuscript's theme touches you?
    i.e I could never understand all the mommy jokes until I became a mother.

    ReplyDelete
  6. You've offered loads of good tips here. And I also highly recommend the informational interview, as it helped to pave my way when I moved to New York to work in publishing. Though I agree, it's important to be well-informed about those you are approaching. The only thing I would add is to find the publisher(s) whose books you find yourself most attracted to, and try to do an internship or get involved in some way. For me, that was Children's Book Press in San Francisco, because I appreciated the social agenda, the bilingual emphasis, and the alternative publishing context. I think it was also easier to make headway at a small publisher. If someone is really passionate and does their homework, they should be able to find something. Though they have to be able to take the low pay (or unpaid internships), which makes it much harder for people without family help/money (perhaps sustaining the white, middle class dominance in the publishing world).

    Finally, in the UK, there's the Oxford Brookes Publishing programme: http://ah.brookes.ac.uk/index.php/publishing/

    ReplyDelete
  7. I'd also suggest reading widely in subject matter. Good writing is universal. One of the many brilliant things about the New Yorker is how even its science as business articles are well written.

    ReplyDelete
  8. "ignore your uncle’s jibes about “Fries with that?” and follow your heart."

    Cheryl! High fives FOREVER!

    Read on!

    Marilyn.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Wonderful and concise with lots of good, solid practical advice. I wish someone had handed me something like that to read when I decided to go into publishing.

    And since you asked, I'd like to make a nice little plug for working at small presses. Experience is experience and even if you aspire for your own imprint at a large press someday, you have to start somewhere. Small presses are great because you get the opportunity to try your hand at all sorts of things. During my tenure at Blooming Tree where I've gone from intern to Senior Editor, I've done everything from actually laying out the book in Indesign to booking authors and release parties. I've sat at festival booths and handsold books. Our current catalog was designed by me - and I don't mean I wrote all of the copy. Getting to see a book go not just from manuscript to bound, but to see it go from manuscript to all the way on a bookstore's shelf can be an amazing feeling, and it's the kind of experience you don't often get at a big press with big staffs.

    Oh, and while we're on the subject, if anyone in Austin, TX is interested in pursuing publishing, I'm looking for an intern (unpaid unfortunately).

    ReplyDelete
  10. Cheryl, I meant to comment on this earlier--fantastic post! I've already directed a few people here who are looking to get into publishing and editorial. I find it amazing (and rare!) that you knew you wanted to be an editor back in HS.

    I would also recommend the informational interview, and yes, do your research BEFORE the interview. There are so many great resources on the internet, books (back when I was trying to break in, I bought a book called MAKING IT IN BOOK PUBLISHING which I think is OP now, but was extremely helpful), seminars and classes, and people.

    I think bookstore and library experience is also extremely helpful to have, and when on your resume, it shows a committment to being in the book industry. The knowlege you gain from working in a bookstore is invaluable to publishing. I worked at B&N, and I probably wouldn't be an editor today without that experience.

    And if knowing my path is helpful to anyone, you can read about it here

    ReplyDelete
  11. Thank you, Cheryl. That was just what I needed.

    Thanks, Alvina for the helpful information.

    ReplyDelete
  12. What a well-written and wonderfully informative blog. My daughter Alex loves books -- reading and writing. She's graduating in May from Denison University with an English Lit degree, Spanish minor and trying to figure out what she wants to do with her life.(Like mother like daughter,grin.) The book world seems like it might be a good fit for her. I've forwarded this to her and will encourage her to look at the summer institutes mentioned. Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
  13. That sounds like great advice; I'm going to follow that. I really hope to become an editor, and I want to thank you for showing me what I should do to become one. I should also thank you because you made me consider being an editor for the first time when you were on PotterCast :D

    ReplyDelete
  14. Thank you so much! I've been toying with this idea lately,trying to figure out what I want to do with my life. This was suggested to me and I wanted to meander the internet for more information...and I've found it! Again, thank you so much for your insight and advice to us aspiring editors!

    ReplyDelete
  15. I was wondering if you know of any publishing houses in the Northwest? I would love to look into an internship in that area! Any advice would be much appreciated.. kdiamond@gonzaga.edu Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
  16. Awsome! I've been looking everywhere for information on "How to become a book Editor" and this really helped! :]

    ReplyDelete
  17. Cheryl,

    This is GREAT information on how to become a book editor! I only wish someone had did this when I was looking for editorial jobs in publishing back when I graduated college in 1990. I really wanted to go into trade but somehow got stuck in reference publishing. Do you have any advice for switching over to the trade side (editorial)?

    Thanks again!

    ReplyDelete
  18. Hi,

    Thanks for the great info. My niece August is 13 and just started junior high school and she reads classics and 700-page books in no time and enjoys writing. I'm teaching her some basics about the publishing industry and would love to prepare her for internships by high school or college. I'll send this url to her. Thanks for the lovely post.

    ReplyDelete
  19. This is wonderful. My 9 year old wants to become an editor, he loves stories but reading is not one of his favorite activities(AS YET!). Hearing this from an editor is great. He's got a ways to go, but this is very useful. Thanks for sharing!

    ReplyDelete
  20. Cheryl,
    I found your blog extremely useful, but it's missing one vital piece of information. (This is not a derogatory comment, keep reading.) Although it's a well placed numero uno Google search, I wish you included information on making a career change to editing. I imagine you know some people who have done it.

    My request for more information is completely selfish as I understand it wasn't your initial intent. Still, I'm hoping you'll be flattered by my request! :) I would really like to know how I could break into the industry after working for 7 years already. I have been working full-time in roles such as Administrative Assistant, Web-designer, and Software Engineer. How can I make a career change, apply the skills I have acquired throughout the years, and avoid a drastic cut in pay?

    I know this blog is old, but if you have time please email me at stacy@serista.com.

    Thank you so much!
    --Stacy

    ReplyDelete
  21. Hi Cheryl!

    Like Stacy who posted the last comment, I had also posted an earlier question (9/9/07) about making a career change to editing children's books, but I forgot to include my email. It is clroget@hotmail.com.

    Thanks so much!

    Crystal

    ReplyDelete
  22. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

    ReplyDelete
  23. Hi,

    Reading IS my favorite thing in the world, but I'm 25, finished with two degrees, working in corporate America doing data entry, and I would LOVE to become a book editor.

    I didn't work on any school newspapers (MUCH too shy in high school) and the only paper editing I've done since then (other than writing and editing my own in college and grad school) was when I spent a semester as an adjunct professor of Freshman Composition.


    What kind of advice would you give to someone in my situation?

    ReplyDelete
  24. Oh, right, my email. galadannun@gmail.com

    Thanks again :)

    ReplyDelete
  25. Hello,

    Thank you for this blog post, it gave me so much information and a site I will come back to. I have one question for you; is it true that most Publisher Jobs are located in NYC? I'm a TX resident and moving is not an option but I always wanted a career in the thing I love, which is reading. Do you have any other options? I thought about getting a masters for a Librarian but I wasn't sure if I wanted to go that route.

    Please if you have a moment you can contact me at nickel1899@hotmail.com

    Thanks

    Nic

    ReplyDelete
  26. I stumbled upon this and I love love love your passion!! Thank you for that. I have a question: How crucial is having a publishing course of some sort? I love books and writing, have worked for my university and community newspapers and currently work in communications, but hate the cubicle/corporate lifestyle, and would really love to entertain the idea of a career in bookediting, however I live in B.C., away from any place that offers such courses. There are also no publishing houses in my city, although it is quite large (and I expect a lot can be done electronically). How feasible do you think my quest is? I'd love to hear from you: jessica.lee43@gmail.com. :)

    ReplyDelete
  27. Great post .. glad I stumbled upon it. I too am looking to make a career change from copyediting for a newspaper to the book world. I have a BS in English and 7 years experince in copyediting for newspapers. Also spent time working for my student newspaper in college. Any advice would be welcome. I currently live in the midwest, but am willing to move, though maybe not to NYC - a bit expensive for my husband and I. TIA! jess.tyler2@gmail.com

    ReplyDelete
  28. Hello,

    I am a technical writing major at Northeastern University. Do you think that a technical writing degree will give me some help in my desire to become an editor. I wanted to major in English but I felt that technical writing concentrates more on the syntax and structure of language than English.

    Thanks,
    Steven

    ReplyDelete
  29. I am in 9th grade and I deeply aspire to be an editor. I love both reading and writing. I have been researching a lot lately and let me tell you, this was the most easiest, straight-forward advice I have found yet. Thanks, Ali.

    ReplyDelete
  30. I am a junior in high school, and I've decided that, due to my insanely voracious and my skills with spelling and grammar as well as writing, I might like to be an editor at a publishing company. So I googled it, and I stumbled upon this blog, which I found insightful and extremely helpful, and I wanted to thank you.
    Also, I read "A Curse Dark As Gold", and I thought it was pretty fantastic.

    ReplyDelete
  31. Dear Cheryl Klein,

    I just wanted to say thank you so much for this article. I know you wrote it ages ago, but it really is wonderful. I'm a freshman in college and I have been debating for ages going into writing or publishing. Still, I've always been wary of either mostly because I was nervous about getting a job in either field, because money makes the sun rise. Reading this article has mostly helped me see that the publishing business is indeed very me, and I should probably stop resisting it when I think that reading books for a living would be one of the best professions ever. Again, thank you.

    Echo M.

    ReplyDelete
  32. I'm changing my major after 4 years from Engineering Physics/Mathematics to Linguistics and English with the hopes of becoming a book editor.

    I only recently realized that (in addition to having no interest in becoming an engineer) I could turn my passion for reading and love for the "science" of language (ie: grammar and spelling) into a career. I was editor of my high school's year book for 3 years. I have worked as typesetter/copy editor for my local newspaper and have edited the schoolwork of countless friends and classmates. I've even spent the last year overseas teaching English as a second language. Don't ask me why I never came to this conclusion sooner, but I was never very good at timing.

    I am not a creative writer, nor do I have any passion for creating my own works of literature. I enjoy doing the occasional Blogger post and commenting on current events, so my question to you is:

    Is a talent for creative writing necessary to start your career in the editing world? Or is it simply enough that I enjoy enforcing and experiencing the structure of the English language in various genres?

    Less important: would you have any idea of the job market/opportunities for this career in Canada? (In regards to major book publishers)

    ReplyDelete
  33. Hi Cheryl,

    I too am stumbling across this 9 years into a completely unrelated job (I can't bring myself to call it a career), and I was looking for advice on breaking into publishing. I'm in the south SF bay area, and I know there are a fair number of publishers within a reasonable distance. Since you know the industry in this area, I was hoping you could suggest an efficient course of action that didn't include becoming a full time student again. Thanks, Maureen (deruntz@hotmail.com)

    ReplyDelete
  34. Hello, I just wanted to tell you this post was very helpful! I'm a junior in high school and I've been considering going on the path of either a writer or a book editor (book editor was just this year).

    I know you are probably quite busy but does it matter if you're really horrible at grammar and would still like to consider a book editor as a future career?

    My email is haroopark@hotmail.com
    Thanks, and just to tell you, this post was extremely easy to understand and informative and I learned a lot just from reading this (:

    ReplyDelete
  35. Hi. I am a soon to be senior in high school. I love to read and write. What kinds of classes should I take in my upcoming year? I am planning on taking an AP Literature course, creative writing, desktop publishing, student publications, and another composition class. When I get to college, what should my major be, to get into a job for, say, Little Brown? What all would an editor have to do in the office? Are there stay-at-home editors? Thank you for typing this up. Its very helpful.

    ReplyDelete
  36. Hello! Thank you so much for this information! I'm only just beginning to look into editing as a career and this is very helpful. I love reading a good story more than anything, though it only just recently occurred to me to look into this occupation. Your advice makes me feel much more confident about this as a plausable, achievable career, as I had no idea where to begin. thank you!

    ReplyDelete
  37. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

    ReplyDelete
  38. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  39. Cheryl, thank you so much for this blog. I just searched for editing jobs and your blog popped up as one of the first results. I must agree with everyone that this has been more informative than anything else I have come across. I, too, will be a career/job changer after being in various secretarial jobs for 10 years and a substitute teacher for the last year. I thought I'd wanted to teach public school, but now I'm not so sure.

    I have always loved books and am an avid reader of fiction. I received my BA in English Lit in 2007 so at least I've got that going for me. I would also like information on transitioning from a different career/job into editing and similar jobs.

    I'm currently living in Central Florida, but moving isn't feasible right now. Does any schools offer online and/or distance learning in the courses. I wish I could take a summer off to undertake an internship, though.

    Anyway, I can be reached at mkmedders@gmail.com. Thanks again!

    ReplyDelete
  40. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

    ReplyDelete
  41. I just want to thank you so much for your great advice. I knew that I wanted to pursue something that deals with reading and you have guided me in the right direction. I have always shown a passion for reading and grammar and now I am totally convinced that this is the perfect career choice for me.

    ReplyDelete
  42. Stephano MuselopolousJuly 23, 2009 6:39 AM

    This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

    ReplyDelete
  43. I'm a 14-year-old, and my future dream job is working in children's book publishing. I really appreciated your post, and I'm always excited to read about what I can get started on now to help with my future career. I may be a little ahead of myself, but I read as much as humanly possible, volunteer at my local library, and eagerly await the New York Times Book Review every Sunday. Thanks so much, it's so nice to hear awesome advice like this!
    (I'm really not crazy, just a little excitable)

    ReplyDelete
  44. Thank you so much for this. I am a freshman in high school and I have known that I want to be a book editor since 7th grade. This is everything I could ever want and so much more.

    ReplyDelete
  45. One of the most important things book editors sportsbook do is acquire books. Book editors read manuscripts (aka unpublished drafts of books) and decide whether the work should or should not be bought and then sold to the public. That decision usually comes down to taste and an eye for bet nfl the market. (While an editor’s fate isn’t entirely dependent on how many bestsellers he delivers, the people who get ahead in this field almost always have some big name books under their belt.
    If you love books and love to read, a job as an editor can be a dream come true. That said, there aren’t an abundance of needles in the proverbial haystack. In other words, much of a book editor’s time http://www.enterbet.com is spent sifting through manuscripts that will never see the light of day, so you have to be OK with reading a lot of bad things in order to find that gem

    ReplyDelete
  46. Thank you so much for posting this- even though I'm only in eighth grade, it's nice to find such a wonderful website that's going to help me decide what I want to do when it's time for me to start a career of my own. Good thing I read this, because, since next year I'm going to be in high school, I need to start doing a lot of this kind of stuff. Not reading or writing, but other important things that you suggested. This is almost actually a life saver, because now I actually know how to start my way to becoming an editor. Thank you so much!

    ReplyDelete
  47. One of the most important things book editors do is acquire books. Book editors read manuscripts (aka unpublished drafts of books) and decide whether the work should or should not be bought and then sold to the public. That decision usually comes down to taste and an eye for the market. costa rica vacation rentals (While an editor’s fate isn’t entirely dependent on how many bestsellers he delivers, the people who get ahead in this field almost always have some big name books under their belt.)
    http://www.meadbrown.com

    ReplyDelete
  48. One of the most important things book editors do is acquire books. Book editors read manuscripts (aka unpublished drafts of books) and decide whether the work should or should not be bought and then sold to the public.costa rica fishing that decision usually comes down to taste and an eye for the market. (While an editor’s fate isn’t entirely dependent on how many bestsellers he delivers, the people who get ahead in this field almost always have some big name books under their belt.
    http://www.fishingcostaricaexperts.com

    ReplyDelete
  49. Many institutions limit access to their online information. Making this information available will be an asset to all.

    ReplyDelete
  50. I am a junior in high school and I was wondering if anyone could give me advice on what colleges publishing houses would be impressed by. I truly hope to become a novel editor and I was also wondering whether an English/business dual major would beneficial. Anyone should feel free to e-mail me at
    nerralinn@gmail.com
    with any advice for a desperate aspiring editor. Thank you.

    ReplyDelete
  51. Your blog is very good, it's the best blog I've ever seen, thank you!
    By the way, do you like polo shirts, which are very chic, especially the polo t shirts, I love them very much. I also like playing tennis rackets, it can keep healthy, what do you like to do? I'd like to introduce myself as the outlet of polo t shirts women, polo t shirts on sale, and polo t shirts for women. These products are our masterpieces, such as polo shirts on sale, polo shirts men, men's polo shirt, men polo shirt, mens polo shirts, mens polo shirt, besides we also sell cheap polo shirts, discount polo shirts, men's polo shirts, women's polo shirts. We are also the outlet of, cheap tennis racket, discount tennis racket, we recommend prince tennis racquet, head tennis rackets, wilson tennis racket, babolat tennis racquet. And it is our great pleasure that you come to our store online!

    ReplyDelete
  52. Stores, whether to the actual sites or grey classic cardy ugg boots online stores probably not many black classic cardy ugg boots sales at the time of Christmas shopping in grey cardy ugg boots full swing. This means genuine cardy ugg boots that right now, with cheap UGG boots can be hard to find. In a few weeks, especially if the stores are women's classic cardy grey not reaching their sales quotas, then ugg australia cardy classic boot more and more and offer incentives for consumers to cardy uggs on sale see the move to open up their cardy ugg boots sale wallets and spend money.

    ReplyDelete
  53. I found this great listing for publishing houses in the Pacific NW: http://www.open-spaces.com/article-v2n3-publishing.php

    ReplyDelete
  54. Great advice! Thank you.
    I just applied to a few publishing courses/programs last week.
    NYU does have a summer publishing program:
    http://www.scps.nyu.edu/areas-of-study/publishing/continuing-education/summer-publishing-institute.html

    ReplyDelete
  55. Like the asics onitsuka tiger australia range, these boots are used in a variety of asics onitsuka tiger online colors including Dusty Rose asics onitsuka tiger shoes australia and indigo, with black and gray oatmeal asics onitsuka tiger buy online available. What makes these shoes so different than other shoes in the range of asics onitsuka tiger mexico 66 make 3 large wooden buttons you some onitsuka tiger mexico 66 by asics really good looks and different styles with them.

    ReplyDelete
  56. Made since the launch of his ASICS GEL-KINSEI 2 campaign by Japan in 2007, marks Onitsuku Tiger trainer has a series of ASICS GEL-Nimbus 9 shoe sculptures created, each of which Onitsuka Tiger Mexico 66 different aspects of Japanese culture.True to its ASICS GEL-Stratus 2.1tradition, Tansu carpentry, sculpture contains a series of boxes and drawers made of wood Onitsuka Tiger Ultimate 81 carved.

    ReplyDelete
  57. Hello I want to congratulate to them by its site of the Web of the excellent looks like entertained and very good very to me it elaborated. I invite them to that they explore a little on my Web site. Lots in Costa Rica

    ReplyDelete
  58. These articles are fantastic; the information you show us is interesting for everybody and is really good written. It’s just great!! Do you want to know something more? Read it...: Great investment opportunity in Costa Rica

    ReplyDelete
  59. hello guys, I like your blog is very interesting your subject .... I would like to receive information about this

    ReplyDelete
  60. Very informative stuff here, I personally appreciate it.

    ReplyDelete
  61. Your recap is perfect for me! My father's writing a book. I English teacher... be wonderful for me, edit my father's book! Thanks for this "post"!

    ReplyDelete
  62. Nice effort, very informative, this will help me to complete my task.

    ReplyDelete
  63. I would never find a better place to read as good comments as this site never seen before.Its easy to find easy to understand, and it have serious comments not sick jokes as others, thanks and please keep like this.

    ReplyDelete
  64. you always have here an interesting things about cameras though,i really appreciate that neverfull | louis vuitton mahina

    louis
    vuitton
    handbags

    ReplyDelete
  65. I'm about to be a freshman in college and my major will be Biology. I think I want to be an orthopedic surgeon because I like the idea of being a doctor and I have personal experience, because I broke my hip in the seventh grade. Lately though I have been considering a job as a book editor. Well actually for a while I thought book editing would be amazing but I'm not very good at writing or English. i love to read though, and can't imagine a better job than reading all the time. I have a few questions. Is it particularly hard to move up in the publishing world? What is the starting salary usually? And is a passion for reading enough?
    I would really appreciate an email. You can reach me at kallammckay@me.com

    ReplyDelete
  66. In the new Louis Vuitton Cabas Rivington core values campaign ,the ads features astronauts photoshop software Buzz Aldrin who is the first woman astronaut into space, Jim Lovell the director of Apollo 13 and Sally Ride the first louis vuitton moda astronaut who left his footprint in the moon. The three astronauts pose buy replica handbags with a battered pickup truck and a travel bag while gazing up into the sky in the California desert nrgbh100901.

    ReplyDelete
  67. Good writing, and I very much agree with your thoughts and insights. Hope that more could write such a good word, I said, to continue coming to visit, thank you for sharing.i love y type strainers

    ReplyDelete
  68. Hey,
    Loving your blog, awesome tips on this you have here. I
    would just like to ask you some questions privately, mind
    contacting me at sales@ company logo design.com
    logo design

    ReplyDelete
  69. Wow I am so stoked...my 4yrold son and I along w/ my mother want to see the show so bad...I am convinced that my little boy Dylan is BEP Biggest fan...some kids pretend to be firemen,Doctors and Police Officers...NOT my Boy HE pretends to be Apple, Will or Taboo and lucky me...he always makes me Fergie! turnstile

    ReplyDelete
  70. http://castsugar.blogspot.com/2009/01/chicken-tikka-masala-with-saffron-rice.html
    http://cfav.blogspot.com/2005/08/i-hate-hillary-clinton.html
    http://chavelaque.blogspot.com/2006/08/faq-2-how-do-i-become-book-editor.html
    http://chinamatters.blogspot.com/2008/03/black-days-for-dalai-lama.html
    http://chrisbegley.blogspot.com/2007/11/time-machine-menu-bar-add-on.html
    http://chrisheuer.blogspot.com/2005/11/us-airways-sucks.html
    http://cityunslicker.blogspot.com/2009/06/north-west-hutton-old-oilmans-story.html

    ReplyDelete
  71. Well don't know whats going on but its not a Good way to do this. in my opinion we have to look again about this issue seo services,jergens natural glow,Pt cruiser accessories,Archipelago Lotion,Floor Covering Garage

    ReplyDelete
  72. that is the most important steps and the most important is the talent

    ReplyDelete
  73. Well don't know whats going on but its not a Good way to do this. in my opinion we have to look again about this Pt cruiser,Pt cruiser accessories,chrysler Pt cruiser,american eagle gold coin

    ReplyDelete
  74. Some days your head will spin because you haven’t sat at your desk long enough to answer last night’s dominical costa rica tours
    email, let alone drink a cup of coffee before your (and your boss’s) phone starts ringing. Most days are scattered — a meeting here, a phone call there, running around for cover art for a while, chasing down a proposal from an agent — and the day is over while you’re still on page 1 of the proposal you need to have read by the end of the week.

    http://www.dominicalcostaricatours.com

    ReplyDelete
  75. I would like to appreciate the great work done by you Generic Viagra

    ReplyDelete
  76. Great webpage! I dont imagine Ive seen every one of the angles of this theme the way in which youve pointed them out. Youre a accurate star, a rock star guy. Youve got a great deal to say and know so much about the subject that i think you ought to just teach a class about it seo services,Content Writting,Web design,Logo Design,Pt cruiser

    ReplyDelete
  77. Great article; I LOVE to read books as well as to write; I am currently in my final year of law school but had I known there was a way that I could do what I love (read books), I would have tried to pursue this field years ago. I would like to combine my love of the law with my love for reading. I live in Ohio and was wondering if you have knowledge of any small publishing companies with a good reputation who is not afraid of the mature person seeking either a paid or unpaid internship and/or could provide an informational interview on this career? Thank you to all the posters for your wonderful information thus far!

    ReplyDelete
  78. I just posted about the "mature person" looking for small publishing houses in Ohio. My email address is: akhlaw12@yahoo.com. Thank you in advance.

    ReplyDelete
  79. What a wonderful post. Thanks for taking the time.

    ReplyDelete
  80. This kind of blog always useful for blog readers, it helps people during research. your post is one of the same for blog readers.

    ReplyDelete
  81. Great webpage! I dont imagine Ive seen every one of the angles of this theme the way in which youve pointed them out. Youre a accurate star, a rock star guy. Youve got a great deal to say and know so much about the subject that i think you ought to just teach a class about it seo services,Pt cruiser accessories,lifetime fitness locations,lifetime fitness

    ReplyDelete
  82. Dear Cheryl,
    First of all, thank you so much for taking the time to write this (some time ago, but still).

    Questions:
    Would the fact that I'm typically not very outspoken (okay, I'm shy) affect my chances of getting an editorial job in the future? Also, what are some recommended colleges for aspiring book-editors?
    If anyone can help, please email me at
    books.forever@ymail.com
    Thanks c:

    And I will definitely refer back to this in the future.

    Again, thank you!
    -Moon

    ReplyDelete